Do some people really need meds?

Do some people need psych meds?

I know someone who had a seemingly bona fide diagnosis of schizophrenia, including psychotic symptoms, which was caused by trauma. He evidently needs to do more to deal with the trauma, yet has also apparently needs psych  meds to quit experiencing psychosis.

In another case, I worked as a home health aide with a man with schizophrenia whose cause for schizophrenia I did not know.  But it was clear to everyone around him that he needs psych meds to quit talking about bizarre stuff (like us supposedly trying to poison his dinner, or

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Why So Many Children Take Antipsychotics

Kids playing on the Tricycle Challenge gear for Bike for the Brain. When children take antipsychotics, what is happening?

A recent article by Dr. Mercola   points out the scope of the problem when children take antispychotics:

In recent years, there has been a massive increase so children take antipsychotics and other psych meds. Aggressive, and often illegal, marketing by drug companies is believed to be a major contributing factor when children take antipsychotics. In recent years, every major manufacturer of atypical antipsychotics has been fined for illegally marketing their drugs for unapproved uses. Prescriptions to make children take antipsychotics

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Talking Back to The Language Police

Language police control ideas as well as words

Recently, I got “beat up” by the language police in a bloody Facebook fight.  I was charged with:

1. Using the term “SMI” to refer to the “Seriously Mentally Ill” population.

2. Asserting that conditions like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were “organic brain disorders,” different than situational issues such as trauma-based depression or stress-related anxiety.

The “language police,” aware of my personal history with traumas from hospitalizations and misdiagnoses, blasted me for my “hypocrisy,” and “holier than thou” attitude. Many people shared stories of having been traumatized by narrow-minded or inaccurate

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Psych Meds Hurt Me, But Helped Others, Part 2 of 2

Psych Meds Hurt Some, Help Others

Anti-psychotic medication made me psychotic, but I met several people during my journey through the mental health system that psych meds helped, at least during the time I knew them.  Each individual reacts differently to every medication, and psych meds can help or hurt, at least in the short term.

I finally ripped myself off anti-psychotics, despite my bullying father’s unfair threat that he wouldn’t have a relationship with me if I didn’t take them. But when I stopped, the psychotic symptoms stopped. I was never really psychotic in the first place.

When I

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Maria Mangicaro – What Is Brief Reactive Psychosis?

Jason Russell, Diagnosed Wtih Brief Reactive Psychosis

All mental health advocates should learn from the recent hospitalization of “Kony 2012? creator Jason Russell. Jason’s behavior was filmed, and it seems clear that he was in a psychotic state, in urgent need of medical services to support the unique needs of someone in an acute, altered state of mind.  According to news reports, Jason’s preliminary diagnosis is ”brief reactive psychosis.”

Danica Russell said she feels her husband’s “irrational” behavior stemmed from exhaustion and dehydration, not drugs or alcohol.

Symptoms and Causes of Brief Reactive Disorder

The National Institutes

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Learning the Difference Between Happiness and Mania Was Hard But Essential

Happiness and Mania

The day I was invited to write regularly for  Robert Whitaker’s website, Madinamerica.com, alongside the best mental health writers in the country, I felt like I’d been called up to the Major Leagues.

But my first thought was to make sure I did not confuse happiness and mania.

I felt honored, recognized, and very proud.  But 30 years after my last manic attack, I still worry that sudden flattering happiness might lead to exhilaration, then mania.

So before I raced to the laptop to start my first blog for him, or tell my friends the wonderful

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The difference between temporary distress and permanent disease

One of the very important disctinctions to peer approaches to mental struggles is that we view problems as temporary and not permanent. It’s a repairable life situation problem, not a lifetime chemical or structural or genetic problem. This is one of the key ideas of the Open Dialogue Model that makes it effective.

Our distress versus disease model is an important paradigm shift to help promote solutions.

I know that in my own personal experience, I wasn’t that ill at the beginning. I became more ill after realizing that I might have these struggles for the rest of my life,

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6 lessons for mental health advocacy from the Google Gigabit Challenge Finale

What Psychiatry and Mental Health Advocacy can learn from the Google Gigabit Challenge Finale in Kansas City

Our business, Wellness Wordworks, was nominated as a semifinalist for Google’s Gigabit Challenge. Our mental health advocacy business plan creates care so efficient that people in distress can pay for it themselves. Wellness Wordworks’ product/service plan will use a video call in support line employing people who have moved beyond their diagnoses to help others get unstuck. We’ll also help people increase their online presence and get online for the first time. Our video based call in line will be a favorite resource

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